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Thorn Abbey - Nancy Ohlin I'm a big fan of Rebecca, a 1938 novel by Daphne duMaurier, so I'm always up for checking out a new interpretation of the story. I think that of the challenges that comes with retelling Rebecca is that many elements of the original story are also things that drive modern YA readers crazy: a female narrator who is mousy and unconfident, a male love interest who runs extremely hot and cold, either declaring his love to the heroine or pushing her away, a strong dose of insta-love, and a plot that builds suspense very slowly. On the positive side of things, Rebecca offers a spooky supernatural vibe and a couple of truly sinister female villains.Thorn Abbey uses a very similar premise to that of another YA Rebecca retelling, New Girl by Paige Harbison: a new girl arrives at a fancy boarding school to find that she's assigned to the room of a dead student, Rebecca. I was glad that Thorn Abbey didn't make the main character meek and mousy, just out of her element. Tess is a scholarship student in a school full of rich kids. She doesn't understand their language -- peppered with talk about Killington and Klonies -- and they treat her with cheerful disdain.Max, the love interest, was a bit of another story. In the original book, the heroine spends the majority of the book feeling that she can never live up to the beauty and talent of her husband Max's dead wife, Rebecca. In Thorn Abbey, Tess is trying to develop a relationship with fellow student Max while worrying that he still carries a torch for his dead girlfriend. Max came off to me as mopey rather than brooding and I never really felt any connection between the two of them.Another challenge in updating Rebecca is that the original book relies on two shocking plot revelations that don't occur until well into the story: first, that Max actually loathed Rebecca, and second, that he was responsible for her death. As a result, some readers I've pushed Rebecca on have found the pace slow compared to a contemporary PNR. The book holds the reader's interest through the heroine's feelings of inadequacy and the way they are intensified by the evil machinations of her husband's creepy housekeeper, Mrs. Danvers. In Thorn Abbey, Mrs. Danvers is re-cast as Tess's roommate, Devon, who came off as more ditzy than demented.But then, Thorn Abbey takes a bold and intriguing supernatural turn: namely, killing Devon and having her possessed by the spirit of the dead Rebecca. I really wish that this had happened earlier in the story, as I think it would have ramped up the tension in the first half of the book. After this revelation, the book really picks up in suspense. The ending is also a bit of a shocker, a spooky departure from the original. On the downside, the ending is very abrupt. Very.As a die-hard fan of Rebecca, I did enjoy Thorn Abbey. I also appreciated the little in-jokes, like the characters' obsession with the movie To Catch a Thief and the new role played by Frank Crawley. Readers who are completely unfamiliar with the original book should keep in mind that a little patience is in order, as like the original Rebecca, Thorn Abbey backloads all the exciting stuff into the last quarter of the story.This review will also be posted on my blog: YA Romantics*I received an e-ARC of this book from the publisher for possible review*