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jenryland

jenryland

Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock - Matthew Quick At times funny, suspenseful, and heart wrenching, Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock is about faith and friendship, about how hard it can be to ask for and receive help, about the importance of human connection.Leonard wakes up on his birthday with a plan: he's going to use his grandfather's WWII pistol to kill some guy named Asher Beal and then himself. But before that, he has a few gifts to drop off, gifts to four people who have made some sort of difference in his life.Leonard is the kind of narrator I adore: smart and sarcastic, with an unpredictability that kept me a little off-balance. Because Leonard is not entirely comfortable in his world, he's a keen observer, a vulnerable smart-ass. He also curses a lot. My problem with him was that he narrated with a lot of footnotes. I am not a fan of footnotes and they are incredibly annoying to read on a Kindle, because you have to click out of the main page to read them. So I did not read every single one, and I hope Leonard can forgive me :)Leonard reveals his murder-suicide plan right off, and then the reader spends the book trying to figure out a) if and b) why Leonard is going to carry it out. Leonard doesn't reveal his motivations for some time. He's going around handing out his gifts, he's interacting with the teachers who have noticed his unusual behavior, he's following random commuters around, trying to figure out if what adults promise is true: do things get better after high school? The book also includes "letters from the future" to Leonard, an aspect of the book that had me a little puzzled initially.This whole book is a puzzle. I kept trying to figure Leonard out. Was he suicidal? Suffering from depression? Did he have some kind of revenge fantasy against kids who had wronged him? The answer surprised me.Read the full review and find more YA reviews and giveaways on my blog, Jen @ YA Romantics I received an e-copy of this book from the publisher for possible review